The Lotus Type 135 electric sports car will have its batteries in an unusual place

Lotus has dropped several clues about its future electrification plans, but a new report has revealed more details about its EV ambition.

Lotus is set to deliver its latest internal combustion car, the Emira, and will step up its electric car efforts in the years to come.

Previously, Lotus’s only indication of its electrified future was the Evija hypercar, but the price of this car and its limited production of 130 units – which will start soon – means that it will be unobtainable for most people.

The automaker’s full plans appear to be much more accessible – at least for a small-production sports car maker. Lotus will build an electric SUV, sedan and crossover, with a sports car coming in 2026.

The sports car, known as the Type 135, will serve as an entry point to Lotus’ catalog and will be seen as a replacement for the Elise.

Lotus will base its electric sports car on a new platform it calls E-Sports, which is said to be 37% lighter than the platform that underlies the new Emira.

To improve balance and weight, the platform incorporates the batteries as a structural component and offers engineers two potential locations for the car’s batteries.

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LEVA project innovation in the architecture of Lotus electric sports cars

(Image credit: Lotus)
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LEVA project innovation in the architecture of Lotus electric sports cars

(Image credit: Lotus)
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LEVA project innovation in the architecture of Lotus electric sports cars

(Image credit: Lotus)

In sporty models, where space is an issue, the batteries will be stacked behind the passenger compartment, almost like a mid-engined car.

This would be an unusual position for electric car batteries and will likely pose some interesting challenges for Lotus.

Larger models, such as the planned electric SUV, will carry the batteries underground – which is the most traditional location for electric vehicles.

The new architecture can also accommodate single or dual engine powertrains, resulting in an impressive power output range of between 350 kW and 650 kW.

This would suggest that there will be some serious performance available for drivers.


Analysis: the challenge for Lotus

The challenge of building an electric vehicle, especially for a sports car brand like Lotus, is weight and balance.

Batteries are heavy and completely change the way a vehicle behaves and behaves on the road.

Lotus has thought about this and solved it – at least partially – with its E-Sports platform, but “adding lightness” can be an intimidating prospect when the building blocks of a vehicle are so heavy to begin with.

The good news is that Lotus parent company Geely also owns Volvo and Polestar, so there are plenty of opportunities to share parts and information between brands.

Via Autocar and InsideEVs


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